A View from the Other Side

Observations from the winged dude next door.

Archive for the tag “silence”

Seek in Silence

Words of wisdom from Tobie, as usual. ~Peter

tobiehewitt

In the silence are all the answers to the quandaries, problems, dilemmas, challenges we face. When we place our questions into the realm that presents itself as silence, those in spirit—loved ones, guides, teachers, and masters—are able to consider the various scenarios that will ensue depending on which answer is given to any given problem. When we place ourselves in a situation of receiving the answer, and carefully consider following it, we are more likely to place our next steps firmly and assuredly on the correct path. When we sit in silence, we can hear the answers we seek, and give thanks! Namaste!

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Some Zen Sunday Thoughts

bonsai treeWe went to a bonsai garden the other day. The man who runs it also had a large selection of “viewing rocks” that he had mounted to  wooden bases. They’re meant to be contemplated, as the little trees are. A miniature landscape, either in green or in stone.

It’s easy to get drawn into that little world where only one thing matters and all the other chaos gets distant. Because it’s in miniature, it’s easy to find relaxation in examining every little branch or bit of moss in a bonsai tree. Your mind can rest and meditate, and at the same time your imagination can place the tree in any world or situation or landscape you like.

The same can be done with anything. A stone, a candle flame, a cup of tea, a statue, a bowl of sand, a woven blanket, your bathroom linoleum, or a blank wall. You can use them to get lost and have inner visions, or you can simply relax and let your eyes follow the patterns to find a calmer place in your mind. Just observe them for a while in silence.

man meditatingI find myself doing this sometimes, especially in prayer. Yes, I pray too. Prayers can be meditations, whether memorized and repeated, or mantras that you chant, or whatever’s ad-libbed off the top of your head.

What do I pray about? I usually ask for help from those above me, same as you. For strength from Michael more than I should. Healing from Raphael sometimes. I give thanks a lot also. I always remember to give thanks for what I have, what I’ve been given, what I can do. I give thanks for the opportunities, for the good to come, for the pain in my past that made me what I am today. I make vows to be stronger and do the best I can for those I watch over. Sometimes, because I’m closer to where these beings are, conversations spring up between us. Sometimes it’s easy, sometimes it’s not. The Lwa, in particular, don’t seem to mesh with me very well, and it’s difficult to access them and talk with them. Angels and saints,  on the other hand, are easy to find and speak with. I’m not sure what that says about me, I just go with what works. Most human-type spirits are pretty easy for me to find, but not always. It depends.

Strangely, I’ve gone from zen thoughts to my dealings with other spirits. I guess it’s just what the zen part of my mind needed to say this evening.

Quietness and Patience

quiet scene at twilighthttp://nwindian.evergreen.edu/curriculum/ValuesBehaviors.pdf

Quietness. Quietness or silence is a value that serves many purposes in Indian life. Historically the cultivation of this value contributed to survival. In social situations, when they are angry or uncomfortable, many Indians remain silent. Non-Indians sometimes view this trait as indifference, when in reality, it is a very deeply embedded form of Indian interpersonal etiquette.

Patience. In Native American life, the virtue of patience is based on the belief that all things unfold in time. Like silence, patience was a survival virtue in earlier times. In social situations, patience is needed to demonstrate respect for individuals, reach group consensus, and all time for “the second thought.”

Nonverbal orientation. Traditionally most Indians have tended to prefer listening rather than speaking. Talking for talking’s sake is rarely practiced. Talk, just as work, must have a purpose. In Indian thought, words have a primordial power so that when there is a reason for their expression, it is generally done carefully.

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